Lung Cancer Screening Guidelines

Most Commonly Referenced Lung Cancer Screening Guidelines

National Comprehensive Cancer Network1

1. Age 55 to 74 years with ≥30 pack-year smoking history and smoking cessation <15 years.

2. Age ≥50 years and ≥20 pack-year smoking history and one additional risk factor (other than secondhand smoke).

2018

American College of Chest Physicians2

Age 55 to 77 years with ≥30 pack-year smoking history and either continue to smoke or have quit within the past 15 years.

2018

1Wood DE, Baum SL, Eapen GA, et al. National Comprehensive Cancer Network Lung Cancer Screening Guidelines. 2018 https://www.nccn.org/professionals/physician_gls/pdf/lung_screening.pdf

2Screening for Lung Cancer: CHEST Guideline and Expert Panel Report
https://cdn2.hubspot.net/hubfs/2802745/Analytics%20Documents/Screening%20for%20Lung%20Cancer-%20CHEST%20Guideline%20and%20Expert%20Panel%20Report.pdf
Accessed May 30, 2018

Other Lung Cancer Screening Guidelines

US Preventive Services Task Force3

1. Age 55-80 years with ≥30 pack year

2. Smoking history and quit smoking <15 years

2013
American Association for Thoracic Surgery4

1. Age 55 to 79 years with ≥30 pack-year smoking history.

2. Long-term lung cancer survivors who have completed 4 years of surveillance without recurrence, and who can tolerate lung cancer treatment in order to detect second primary lung cancer until the age of 79.

3. Age 50 to 79 years with a 20 pack-year smoking history and additional comorbidity that produces a cumulative risk of developing lung cancer ≥5% in 5 years.

2012
American Cancer Society5 Age 55 to 74 years with ≥30 pack-year smoking history, either currently smoking or have quit within the past 15 years, and who are in relatively good health. 2016
American College of Chest Physicians and American Society of Clinical Oncology6

Age 55 to 74 years with ≥30 pack-year smoking history and either continue to smoke or have quit within the past 15 years.

2012
American Lung Association7 Age 55 to 74 years with ≥30 pack-year smoking history and no history of lung cancer. 2012
American Academy of Family Practice8

Evidence is insufficient to recommend for or against screening.

2013

3Lung Cancer: Screening
https://www.uspreventiveservicestaskforce.org/Page/Document/UpdateSummaryFinal/lung-cancer-screening
Accessed May 30, 2018

4Jaklitsch MT, Jacobson FL, Austin JH, et al. The American Association for Thoracic Surgery guidelines for lung cancer screening using low-dose computed tomography scans for lung cancer survivors and other high-risk groups. J Thorac Cardiovasc Surgery 2012;144:33–38.  http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22710039
Accessed May 30, 2018

5Smith RA, Andrews K, Brooks D, et al. Cancer screening in the United States, 2016: A review of current American Cancer Society guidelines and current issues in cancer screening.
CA Cancer J Clinicians 2016;66:96–114.
Accessed May 30, 2018

6Bach PB, Mirkin JN, Oliver TK, et al. Benefits and harms of CT screening for lung cancer: a systematic review.
JAMA 2012;307:2418–2429.
Accessed May 30, 2018

7American Lung Association. Providing guidance on lung cancer screening to patients and physicians: An update from the American Lung Association Lung Cancer Screening Committee. April 30, 2015.
http://www.lung.org/assets/documents/lung-cancer/lung-cancer-screening-report.pdf
Accessed May 30, 2018.

8American Academy of Family Physicians. Clinical Preventive Service Recommendation: Lung Cancer.
http://www.aafp.org/patient-care/clinical-recommendations/all/lung-cancer.html
Accessed May 30, 2018